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Sticky Notes

TIred of boring messages spread across your board?

Then liven it up by downloading Sticky Notes

Not only can you pick and choose what user groups to show them to, you can even allow your members to send personal sticky notes to other members

TheJackal TheJackal
IPSDev

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  1. Yesterday
  2. Last week
  3. New Features Added Ladder tournaments Choose from either 6 Teams, 10 Team, 15 Team or 21 Team tournaments Once all teams have joined and the tournament is started it will calculate the order of the ladder by the teams skill with the highest being in 1st place Teams can only challenge other teams who are within 1 tier of them ( example if the team is in teir 3 they can challenge teams in tiers 2 and 4 ) Team owners will receive a notification when receiving a challenge from another team If a team rejects a challenge it will show publicy they rejected it Users who sent the challenge have the ability to remove their challenge request ( this is for if another team is ignoring their challenge ) Once a team owner sends a challenge they can not challenge another team in that tournament unless it gets rejected / removed or accepted and then the game and been played ( This is not to confuse the placing of the teams ) Once a challenge has been sent and then played, the challenger will not be able to challenge that team they just played until they play another team first Changed the joined teams tables in the tournaments to use the tournament stats for wins, loses, draws and their win %, instead of their overall stats Added a create tournament button to the teams homepage Added a create team button to the tournament index page Added the ability to create tournaments without having to add a team to it Added the ability for tournament creators ( or moderators with edit permissions ) to replace teams in tournaments When replacing a team, if that team has played say 3 matches they will not lose their stats from them 3 matches on their teams stats, BUT it will show the newly added teams name on them 3 matches of the tournament itself, the newly added team will not gain the stats from them 3 matches either Added the ability for team owners ( or moderators with edit permissions ) to change a teams owner to another member As well as changing the owner they have 2 more options Leave the team completly Stay on as a team player
  4. Earlier
  5. New Features You can now choose to use either the default sound for new messages or you can upload your own .mp3 You can now choose to use either the default sound for the online user list or you can upload you own .mp3 Added the ability for members to invite other members to chatrooms Members will receive a notification when receiving a invite Users can send up to 5 invites at a time Added the actual amount of users in the online user list Shows the amount of members online ( Excluding anonymous users ) Shows the amount of anonymous users online Shows the amount of guests online Changed the online user count on the chatrooms and widget etc to include the amount of guests browsing Added a exclude list for the global floating chatroom This is a list of applications you have installed, you can choose to exclude from showing the chatroom on your selected applications
  6. If multiple purchases are made, only 1 code gets delivered to the customer.. Is there anyway to fix this ?
  7. This plugin will add a AgePass check to your website, This can be used for multiple sites including gambling, firearms, adult site and so on This plugin will comply with the new UK laws on minors being able to access adult related sites for more information on AVSecure go to https://avsecure.com/
  8. Version 1.0.0

    This plugin will add a AgePass check to your website, This can be used for multiple sites including gambling, firearms, adult site and so on This plugin will comply with the new UK laws on minors being able to access adult related sites for more information on AVSecure go to https://avsecure.com/

    15.00 USD

  9. This plugin will add a AgePass check to your website, This can be used for multiple sites including gambling, firearms, adult site and so on

    This plugin will comply with the new UK laws on minors being able to access adult related sites

    for more information on AVSecure go to https://avsecure.com/

    15.00 USD

  10. New Features Commerce Added points as a payment gateway to be used for purchases Each currency you use will have a conversion rate ( Example, if you are using USD and set it to 100 then a $10 item would cost 1,000 points ) Removed the ability to sell points via commerce packages ( This has been replaced read below ) Added the ability for members to buy points by entering the amount they want to buy Each currency you use has it's own conversion rate ( Example, if you are using USD and set it to 100 then each $1 spent will give the user 100 points ) Set the minimum amount users are allowed to buy Set the maximum amount users are allowed to buy ( This is per transaction ) Set price examples Create a list of points & on the buying points page it will show a list of example prices with the list of points you created along with the price they would cost When a user changes the amount of points they are buying, the checkout button will update with the price of the points Enhancements Removed all database columns linked to and of the IPS apps and or core_xxx tables and created custom ones for this app Bug Fix Fixed the bug in the ACP membership upgrade page for if you have a deleted usergroup in there it would throw a error
  11. Communities are bound by a code of conduct that govern user behavior. Sometimes these rules are explicitly written, such as terms, guidelines, or my personal favorite: “Must Read Before Posting Or Banned!!!” topics. (That’s a joke. Please don’t ever write a topic like that!) Sometimes the rules are unwritten, based on evolving behaviors and user-to-user interaction. No matter the method of conduct or scale of communication, all communities contain these community guideposts that govern user behavior. Being able to influence, and being influenced by, these rules of conduct is our second element of Sense of Community. Community Managers. The original influencers. The privilege to persuade is a powerful feeling. It fills users with a sense of control, knowing that they can impact others. It gives purpose to users, who will tap into their inner helpfulness by assisting others. And it imparts a sense of satisfaction, which is one of the highest transcendent values a user can feel. It also leads to a better community. Over time, the mutual interaction between members builds trust, forming a community of authenticity where users can expect repeatable and expected behaviors. It also leads to good governance, where members embrace the codes of conduct by the group, inculcate the code into their own behaviors, and repeat the code to newer members – reinforcing the very codes they learned themselves. Members conform to community rules and standards, sacrificing a little bit of their own individuality but gaining acceptance by the community. Clearly, influence and persuasion is a powerful element. Let’s take a look at some ways in which you can build a better community by unlocking the power of influence. 1. Show New Members How to Influence If your community is anything like mine, you have a welcome topic or message: Do this, read, that, follow this. It’s usually filled with stuff to influence the member. But have you thought about giving the new member an opportunity to influence? And not just in a superficial manner like posting an Introduction topic, but one that’s filled with meaning and purpose. In addition to linking to the best guides and expert content in your community, ask your users to help other members, answer challenging topics, or identify any skills that can help others. 2. Influence through explanations Have you seen communities where the moderators take heavy-handed actions and do things without prior notice? Or they assume you know everything? It feels rude, unwelcoming, and very cliquish. On the other hand, I’ve also seen communities where the moderators and community managers take the time to explain every response. When you take the time to explain the response, you share your reasoning with others. That’s influence. Over time, users will turn around to repeat the reasoning to others, which builds good governance. (It also means less work for you!). Communities are built on transparency and trust, and the more you can openly establish your community norms, the more clearly other users can repeat and reinforce your governance. 3. Be influenced by asking for help One of the most powerful and uplifting things you can do is to ask your members for genuine help. Be candid. Be vulnerable. Explain the challenge. And ask for help. You will find members who will rise to the occasion. Humans are naturally compassionate. We will always help others if we can and communities are one of the best platforms to ask and receive help. If you ever make a mistake, take on a big project, or if you’re ever in over your head, don’t be afraid to ask for help and allow others to influence you. 4. Influence as a privilege One of the stellar reasons for choosing Invision Community are the multiple ways to publish content. You can offer user albums, polls, blogs, articles, discussions, files, clubs, the list goes on. This allows you to offer increasing channels of influence for your superusers. Unfortunately, most communities throw all the choices at a new user, hoping one will stick. That’s like asking a new member who steps into a room of strangers if he wants a microphone, a loudspeaker, and a spotlight! That can be scary. Influence is something to be gained over time, in small bits of comfort and trust. 5. Appreciate the influence. One of the most inspiring actions you can do as a community manager is to acknowledge and appreciate the influence of others. When you do, you affirm the influence of others. It's one of the simplest things you can do too. Pick three random post by members on your site and reply: “I appreciate this contribution because …”. You’ll be surprised by how well members respond to your note of appreciation. CONCLUSION The best influencers are the members who care about the needs and wants of other members. The power to influence is one of the greatest gifts you can give to your members. By allowing them to influence other members, the codes of conduct, and even the direction of your community, they feel a deeper sense of community because they can make an impact on others. The most influential members in a community are surprisingly not the ones who post the most or who act the most dominant. The best influencers are the members who care about the needs and wants of other members. Share in the comments below one of your success stories on how you influenced – or were influenced by – another member. As always, I appreciate your contribution to join me in helping Invision Communities of all sizes build more rewarding and successful communities. View the full article
  12. It was a poster of Slash holding his Gibson Les Paul slung low on his waist playing live that got me into guitars. The crunching power chords of Appetite For Destruction were a long way from the three chords I could manage on a beaten up acoustic with a hole in the side, but I kept on trying until I could play those riffs. I still hold a special love for the Les Paul (as well as the Explorer made famous by Hetfield palm muting his way through multiple albums with Metallica). So, I'm especially thrilled to see the official Gibson forums relaunched with Invision Community 4. Check it out: https://forum.gibson.com It's great timing as I've recently freed my guitars from the loft and have started to play again. Anyone else here play guitar, and should we start our own band? View the full article
  13. Facebook Ads: are they the modern day ‘hilly billy’ California Gold Rush? Rumors circulate about Facebook Ads being the MOST profitable way to advertise your business and everyone jumps on it to make a quick buck. Hence it’s quickly become the 21st century gold rush. And just like the gold rush, the people really profiting are the ones selling the tools to the prospectors… AKA Facebook But they’re still gold out there if you know where to look and what your doing. The purpose of this post is to give you a short introduction, so you know roughly how to make profitable ads. It’s not going to turn you into an expert, but it might stop you digging in the wrong spot and spending BIG on things you should avoid. I’m not going to go into too much technical detail… Otherwise we’ll find ourselves like Alice down deep the rabbit hole. What Type Of Marketing Is Facebook Ads? It’s important to define Facebook Ads as interrupt marketing. Someone is not actively looking for your product at the time of seeing your ad. So your ads need to be distracting and bold to literally GRAB attention. If people are more likely to be searching your products then should you choose Facebook Ads as a primary marketing channel? Why Does That Matter For Building Communities? When you’re using Facebook Ads to build communities (especially off the platform e.g. not a Facebook Group). Your ads need to be eye catching and demand attention, with a clear benefit of the community AND call to action (what to do next). If you’re community is big then use the size as social proof, people follow the herd and using this herd mentality when talking about the number of members etc will help you grow. Does Facebook Work For Every Business? As a primary marketing channel? Absolutely not. If you have a business that people proactively search for that’s very transactional - like an ecommerce store then you’d be better using google adwords. Yet any business SHOULD 100% be retargeting website visitors with ads. It’s a great way to build rapport and make the most of your site visits. If your business is a business that’s heavily reliant upon growing a relationship then Facebook Ads is perfect. Big purchases, information products, service based businesses all do VERY well with Facebook Ads. It’s a great place to grow and build relationships with your audience. In my opinion this is the MOST powerful way to use Facebook Ads. Do Facebook Ads Help Build Communities Absolutely yes… Facebook Ads can help you build and grow your community. Be clear on your message and the benefits of the community. Having a good understanding of the audience will help too. If it’s a male audience of people who like Star Wars for example, there’s no point advertising to women or people who like football. There is merit in testing adverts to the same interests groups e.g. men who like Star Trek. How To Get The Most From Your Facebook Ads Being successful with Facebook Ads is much more about relationship building than it is billboard advertising. One of the biggest mistakes I see is people using Facebook Ads as the internet’s ‘yellow pages’ I.E. The only adverts they ever place are “hey come buy my stuff” If you only use FB Ads for sales messages it’s going to be crazily expensive and ultimately ineffective. Still people ONLY want to pay for an ad when they have something specific. Instead, think of the platform as an extension of networking, with the same relationship interactions. Only your paying Facebook to have these ‘interactions’ and not having to do it manually. The BEST Way To Do This Is Retargeting Retargeting in the oldest & simplest sense of the word was when someone visited your site or product you identify them and give them adverts that are “come back and buy” This makes things MUCH more effective. But here’s how you get a system that works… You want to layer your retargeting… That means have multiple different offers that are layered one on top of the other. If you’ve heard the expression sales funnel (the process of ‘funnelling’ potential customers through your marketing into customers) then that’s essentially what you’re creating on Facebook all via your retargeting. Sounds complicated… It’s not… For example I could record a video about facebook ads and retarget people who have watched 25% of the video (because I know they’re interested). Then I might give them the option of downloading a PDF to add them to my list… Those that take the PDF could then be offered a webinar. At the end of the webinar is the option to become a customer. The layering of funnels takes time and is more work, hence most people choose the less effective ‘yellow pages’ method. I could go on and on about the nuances involved in advertising on Facebook. But here’s some dos and don’ts to keep you in check Do Treat the platform more like networking than the ‘Yellow Pages’ Focus on building relationships and meaningful interactions. Make sure you’re using retargeting, whatever business you’re running. When writing adverts focus on the customer and their wants, needs, desires Give value before you ask for something in return. Understand your maths and make sure it’s profitable. Layer your retargeting Read the terms and conditions and make sure you’re compliant (otherwise you will get banned) Don’t Expect to become an overnight millionaire. Put big budgets in you can’t afford to lose until you know it works. Copy everyone else ads. Use boring stock photography. Try and cheat the system. Get too hung up with the technical It’s A Powerful Tool, Not A Panacea There’s an epidemic out there (mainly from Facebook Ad Consultants) who push it as the panacea to all business problems. It’s not true… Facebook Ads is a super powerful tool that you could use to grow your community. Especially if you’re struggling to attract new members. It’s not a miracle cure. If there’s a problem with your community messaging or attractiveness then Facebook Ads won’t fix it. Instead Facebook Ads is more of a magnifying glass. It will highlight any problems. Which is very helpful if you don’t know where the gaps are in your community. Not so good if you’re expecting a miracle. Final Thought If you’re thinking about using Facebook Ads for your community then you 100% SHOULD! Depending on your budget will decide if you get someone paid who knows what they’re doing (like me) or you run the ads yourself. If you do find someone make sure they’re realistic with the platform and what it can achieve. If you’re doing it yourself, then have a go… Try a traffic campaign to get you started. The WORST that can happen is you’ll spend a bit of money without getting anything in return. It’s only beginner tax… Or making a donation to the ‘Zuck Fund’ as it’s known in the industry. I’ve seen total beginners make 5 figures with their first ad… It’s pretty rare, but I’ve seen it happen. The ONLY thing you can do is have a play and see what happens. It doesn’t bite. Martin Jolley-Jarvis is the owner of Full Spectrum Agency. View the full article
  14. Good evening! How to access the development section?

  15. When I wrote my last entry, The Dogly Mail had just reached the 100 member milestone but since then things have grown impressively. The photo competition has proven very successful at encouraging new signups and we are now at around 1400 members picking up 15-20 new members a day. This is far better than I could have hoped for but there a few caveats… Not all traffic and content is equal In building website traffic I’ve realised that high member numbers are great and help to validate your ideas but member quality is far more important. I have been able to boost the member growth non-organically with a minimal Facebook ad spend in conjunction with the competition but we’re still trying to find those super contributors. The members we have are not yet invested in the site themselves and the sense of community that is required to be sustainable long term is still in its infancy. We have also found that with the opt-in mailing list, around 50% of the registered members are signing up for the newsletter during registration. This is encouraging to me based on the non-organic growth so hopefully, with more organic growth this will rise further. What are we doing to get higher quality contributions? We are collaborating with a vet on professional articles to give the site more credibility in the areas I am not an expert in and Andy is covering dog news where he has time. Hopefully, over the long term, this will help to improve the organic traffic to the website. With the articles, we now have high-end long-form content covered although I would like to get a more varied team of writers on board to broaden the appeal of the subject matter. We also have more fun commenting, likes and meme social interaction covered in the photo competition section. This leaves a gap in the middle for more serious user-contributed discussion and opinion and what ultimately will make or break the website. For this, we’re working on getting the blogs application ready for when we feel the traffic is sufficient to launch another area. When it’s ready we will slowly transition the ad spend towards the new blog section and forums to provide more balanced traffic coming to the site. We will also be able to promote the new sections via the newsletter. I am almost at the end of the school year so my time on the site should increase and I can get more involved with discussion topics to try and foster that sense of community. What else have I learned? Keeping people’s attention is not easy and once a member has left the site you need to work really hard to get them to revisit. It’s something I read a lot of on these forums so hopefully, Invision is working on this to help us keep people engaged. As you can see we’re still in the try lots of things to see what works stage but the learning experience is part of the fun. We were running AdSense ads and getting a little back from the spend we were doing ourselves but I feel at this stage it is counter-productive. We have decided to stop AdSense for the time being in order to concentrate on building traffic and the membership and will revisit the monetisation options once the site has grown. Not running the adverts has also given the site a substantial speed boost which will hopefully help us with organic rankings. If you’re running your community as a hobby you may not wish to spend anything on advertising to start and may prefer to slowly add to your website content. With so much competition for traffic online though this would be a very slow strategy for us for what I still hope to be a commercially viable micro business. On the current growth path, I hope to be profitable in 12-18 months and will keep you updated with the highs or lows along the way. View the full article
  16. A successful community only needs three core elements to flourish and begin producing results. Your community will require some care and effort to flourish, but with the right strategies in place, you'll ensure that the value your community produces continues to increase as time goes by. Let's take a look at the three elements that make for a successful community. Content Content is the life-blood of any community. Content is what is posted by your members, and by your team. In the early days, you'll need to seed discussions and respond to customers posts regularly. It's important to demonstrate that you're actively involved with the community and encouraging others to post and extend discussions. Over time, user-generated content will begin to propel your community forwards. A great way to bring in new users is to write valuable articles using Pages, or the Blog apps. Writing about issues relevant to your community can help position you as an expert and will be shared widely by your community. You don't have to be an expert writer to create articles. There are free apps such as Grammarly to help polish your prose. A great way to quickly generate new content is to quote other news sources and offer your own commentary. For example, if your community is based around TV shows, right now you could easily create a new article for your site based on Game of Thrones by quoting a small part of two or three existing articles denouncing how the quality of writing on Game of Thrones has slipped and offer your contrasting thoughts. Just remember to link back to the original article and check the source site to make sure they are happy for this to happen. HubSpot has a great article on how to quote without stealing. Traffic To really start building your community, you need a steady flow of visitors from outside sources. The content you create will drive traffic into your community, but it sometimes needs a helping hand. Content from inside established communities can drive millions of impressions a month from search engines. It's worth making sure you're making good use of the built-in SEO tools. We recently performed a thorough review of how Invision Community optimises for SEO including adding features such as lazy loading. It is also a good idea to put your community link in your email signature, and share it widely via social media. A good number of our successful community owners have created a Facebook page, and a Twitter account for their community and share their best content over those social channels. Email is still a very powerful tool for creating an audience. We send out a monthly newsletter here at Invision Community, and articles we share with it are viewed at least four times as much as other articles. Engagement Once you have a steady stream of visitors consuming content on your site, you need to engage them to convert them from a casual visitor to a registered member, and then beyond. The first step is to get your visitor to register. While we recommend you make many forums open for guest viewing, we do recommend that you ask for guests to register before posting. We recently added a new feature called 'Post Before Registering' that allows guests to reply and sign-up in one simple activation flow. Most members initially join for selfish reasons. Perhaps they have a broken iPhone and want to ask for help. Or perhaps they came to ask how to fix a code problem. Generally speaking, they do not join out of altruism and a strong desire to help others. To convert a one-time poster to a regular contributor can take some work. Ensuring the default notifications include email when a new post is made will help encourage the poster to return. You can also tag the member in other discussions you feel may be interesting to them. We recently added a few new engagement features that also showcases other interesting content in notification based emails. Taking the time to welcome the member, and showing them how to access the best from your community can go a long way to making your site stand out. Taking the time to focus on these three core elements will help your community grow and prosper. You may not see overnight results, but over time you will start to see a huge difference in visitors, registrations and returning members. That wraps it up for this article. We'd love to know your thoughts on our suggestions and any strategies that you've used in the past that have worked well. View the full article
  17. Have you ever found yourself muttering "there has to be an easier way" when managing your community? If you have, it's likely that you are not the first person to think that. Invision Community has been refined over nearly two decades, and in that time we've received a lot of feedback from clients running very large and busy sites. We love a short cut, especially when it makes our clients lives easier. There's plenty of time-saving features throughout Invision Community, and here are five of the best. Saved Actions If you routinely perform the same actions to a topic, such as replying before closing it or moving the topic to a different forum, then saved actions will save you a lot of time. Let's look at a practical example. You have a forum where your members can suggest new features for your product. You might choose to move some of these suggestions to another forum to shortlist them for inclusion in a future version, or to discuss further. You also may like to reply thanking the member for their idea, but it's not feasible at this time. Here you would set up two saved actions, one that replies and moves the topic to a specific forum, and one that replies to the topic and closes it for further commenting. Your saved actions are accessible via the moderation menu You and your moderating team can select these saved actions quickly when reading a topic to perform multiple moderation steps in one go. RSS Feeds If your community regularly discusses topics that feature in the latest news, then you can quickly seed these discussions using the RSS feed import tool. Not only can you import almost any public RSS feed into your community, but you also have control over how these topics are displayed, to whom they are attributed to and how the link back to the source article looks. RSS feed import is an often overlooked but handy tool at starting productive discussions without the need to source and post them manually. iCal Feeds The iCal feed can be considered as the sister feature to the RSS Feed Import tool. It works in a very similar way in that it can accept almost any public iCal feed and import events into your community's calendar. This is especially useful if you maintain an event stream outside of the community, but wish to share those events with your members in a native way, or perhaps you already have a calendar product used by your organisation. Using the iCal feed tool to populate your community calendar with key dates relevant to your community can be achieved very quickly. Auto-moderation Moderating a busy community can be a time-consuming task. Trying to review new posts and topics to ensure they meet your community standards as they come in can be daunting. Fortunately, Invision Community has an ace up its sleeve. Auto-moderation allows you to use the power of your community to identify and remove content that does not meet your community standards. The administrator sets up a threshold so that when a specific number of reports for that content item is crossed, the content is hidden. Auto-moderation has a lot of options to configure which we covered in this blog article recently. Group promotion Ensuring your members feel valued and rewarded for their contributions is key to member retention and keeping engagement high. A simple way to reward long term regular contributors is to elevate their permissions. This can mean that they have access to otherwise hidden areas, or they get more allowances in terms of upload space and fewer restrictions. To do this manually would take a significant amount of time. Thankfully, Invision Community has a feature called Group Promotion. This tool allows the administrator to set up specific thresholds such as post count, or time since joining which then move the member into a new group when triggered. This all happens automatically. Just set it up and let it run! We spoke about Group Promotion recently, take a look here to learn more about this feature. How many of you are already using these features, and which ones did we miss off our list? I'd love to know. View the full article
  18. Cultivating a strong Sense of Community is a clear goal for community builders. Develop a strong sense of community, and you’ve built a community experience that sparks a more meaningful and connected community that your members will love. A strong sense of community means: An integrated community where members feel personally related An impactful community where a member can influence and be influenced by the group. A fulfilling community where members meet the needs of others and can feel rewarded. A shared community, where users undergo common history, time together, and social experiences. Do you believe you’ve developed a strong sense of community? Follow long as we critically examine the first element in the Sense of Community: Membership. Membership Boundaries of communities have always existed, whether it be neighborhoods, social groups, or online communities. By definition, there are people who belong and people who do not. It’s okay to decline membership to users, thereby providing a more comfortable space for members who are accepted. Here are some time-tested tips from my years of community management that touch upon various attributes of membership: Don’t try to be everything to everyone. It’s far better to be an exclusive community to a smaller, impassioned group of users than to dilute your community for a wide audience. Not everybody deserves to belong, and by intentionally removing irrelevant members, it makes it a more purposeful community for those who can join. Define who should belong, and outline the requirements on your Registration screen and Guest Sign-up widget. Boundaries are walls, but safe walls. Although there’s the pain of rejection and isolation of private communities, it’s offset with the positive benefits of joining. It creates a space where members can feel safe to open up, to feel related to one another, and to feel protected. Reinforce the benefits of joining the community to new members in a welcome message. A new sense of identification. Not only do members join the group, they should develop an extended sense of belonging and identity with the group. The more strongly you can define the sense of belongingness, the more deeply the member will feel connected. There should be a feeling of acceptance, an expectation that one fits in, and a willingness to sacrifice for the group. Create a welcome team that immediately reaches out both publicly and privately, ask how the new member can contribute, and constantly highlight how the community has gone above-and-beyond in members helping members. The higher the boundary, the greater the reward. Personal investment is an important contributor to a member’s feeling of group membership. By working for a membership, a member will feel like he’s earned a place – and that the membership will be more meaningful and valuable. You can ask guests for their accreditations, background, or how they can contribute to the community. The power of symbols. Social groups throughout history have long used symbols, icons, ceremonies, and group language to cultivate a unique sense of identity. These conventions are powerful representations of a group. You can cultivate and write a common language in your Invision Community in large ways and small by uploading unique reactions, changing the language string, and celebrating community-specific holidays and events. As you re-evaluate your community framework with me, take the time to outline what it means to be a member of your community. Defining your membership goes hand-in-hand with defining your purpose. It should touch upon these five attributes of membership: boundaries, emotional safety, sense of belonging, personal investment, and common symbolism. Establish clear distinctions for your community’s membership qualifications, and you’ll be able to develop a deep Sense of Community from the very start of a member’s registration. Share with me and others how you've defined your community's membership in the comments below. I love to hear about other Invision Communities. Joel, Invision Community Advocate and Certified Community Manager View the full article
  19. New Features Members can now create their own chatrooms Member chatrooms will appear in a tab on their profiles Select what user groups can create their own chatrooms Owners of the chatrooms have full permission over the ban list for their chatrooms Added the ability to toggle the online user list to be shown or hidden You can now edit the chatrooms via the front end Added some buttons to the chatrooms section title Added a button on the chatrooms to allow users to toggle the sound on or off Moved the rules to a button what will pop up showing the rules Moderator buttons Moved the ban list to here Edit Chatroom ( Moderators with permission can edit the chatroom from the front end ) Added a button allowing moderators to delete all messages in the chatrooms Members can now send private messages via the widgets ( if they have permission to whisper that is ) You can now toggle the widget to show or hide New ACP settings for member created chatrooms Choose what groups can create chatrooms Choose what groups can whisper in chatrooms Choose what groups can manage their chatrooms ( Manage = the ability to delete messages from the chatroom ) Select the amount of messages to show in the message list
  20. Hello, What is the status on the case? Kind regards Club Dark
  21. New Features Bots Standard Message Create a message via the editor and the bot will post the messages each cycle Random Messages / Quotes Create messages / quotes from a stack setting allowing you add as many as you want and the bot will post random ones each cycle Standard & Random Message Cycle Settings Run cycle every 5 minutes Run cycle every 15 minutes Run cycle every 30 minutes Run cycle every 60 mintutes Run cycle every 3 hours Run cycle every 6 hours Run cycle every 12 hours Run cycle every day Members Shop Create a message when a user purchases a item Lottery Create a message when a new game is created Create a message when a game has been drawn Create a message when a member claims a winning ticket Sports Betting App Create a message when a member places a bet Create a message when a member claims a winning ticket Media Uploader Create a message when a member uploads a image Create a message when a member uploads a video file Create a message when a member uploads a audio file Create a message when a member uploads a document
  22. New Features Added a 3rd party application integration extension
  23. New Features Added a 3rd party integration extension
  24. New Features Added a 3rd party application integration Bug Fix Fixed the bug where it would sometimes bypass the approval of a upload
  25. New Features Re-wrote the download files points system for storing the points Added images to items You can upload multiple images to items Images will only show on the shop front, not on any saved items in the users myitems page Added another extension for 3rd party application integrations
  26. Yeah the random bots and normal message bots are all done and tested, I will release it once I finished adding the bots for my other apps
  27. Have you finished testing this aspect of the chat room?
  28. I don't actually use any of the social stuff, I messaged someone to ask why it might happen and am waiting for a reply, I'll let you know
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